How to Repair Loose Recessed Lights that Keep Falling Down

While recessed lights are especially great in low-ceiling environments, getting them to stay in place can sometimes take a lot more work than what you would initially expect.

Some clips can work pretty well and hold the light bulb (and its fixture) in place. However, when two or more clips fail to provide the adequate support, your recessed light will start to hang down.

The good news is that there is one permanent way to fix your recessed light, and you can do it by following these steps:

1. Find a heavy-duty staple gun
The first step to any repair is in finding the right tools, and with a recessed light, you only need one – a heavy-duty staple gun.

This is because there isn’t much to most recessed light fixtures other than thin sheet metal, wiring, and a lamp base, and that its structure is more likely to weaken the more you try to mess around with it.

With a heavy-duty staple gun, you can make a quick, decisive fix that will keep your lights in place.

2. Jam staple in the recessed light housing
Inside the ceiling plenum, the clips that secure your light are supposed to move upward at first before moving downward, with four of them working in total to hold your fixture in place.

The clip will lock in place when it’s properly engaged. However, if the clip rattles, then it means it’s not doing what it’s supposed to.

There are a few types of repairs usually recommended for this:

• Bending – Bending the clips outward can help them better engage when pushed into place.

• Rapping – Sharply rapping the clip once with a small, heavy object can fix it. However, if rapping it once will not fix it, then neither will any subsequent rapping.

• Jamming – Another method to securing the clips is by keeping them in place with small items jammed between them and the light housing, and this is where the staple gun comes in.

3. Staple between the clip and the housing
Adjust the staple gun and fire the staple in a way that one “leg” of the staple itself is jammed between both the clip and the housing. The other leg will bend over to form an arm to secure the whole clip.

Alternatively, you can also puncture the housing using a staple leg, and it will hold in place because the housing itself is made of weaker material than the staple used to keep it in place.

Once your recessed lights are secure, they should be best left alone – the more you fiddle with them, the weaker they will get. At best, they have a lifespan of one or two re-stapling procedures before you need to replace the housing with a new one.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *